Memorial Day

The cemetery at Base Hospital No.3 for Americans who died at the hospital.  circa 1918

The cemetery at Base Hospital No.3 for Americans who died at the hospital, 1918

Memorial Day is set aside to remember the servicemen and women who have died while in service to their country. Ceremonies started after the Civil War and it became a national holiday after World War II.  Since injury and death are a part of war, doctors and nurses have always been witnesses to the ravages of battlefields.  The image above shows the American cemetery at Base Hospital No. 3, the Mount Sinai Hospital-staffed unit that served in France.

While the deaths happened abroad, the biggest impact was felt at home. It was not only families that marked their losses, but institutions as well.  By World War II, service flags were a familiar patriotic symbol.  The photo below shows Mount Sinai’s flag hanging from 1184 Fifth Avenue.  The number on the bottom shows how many Mount Sinai doctors, nurses, staff and trustees were in the service at that time.  The gold star at the top showed how many had died. By the end of the war, Mount Sinai’s numbers had grown to 802 served, nine dead.

The Mount Sinai Hospital service flag, 1944

The Mount Sinai Hospital service flag, 1944

Those nine are recognized here:

  • Nils Carson
  • Sydney C. Feinberg, MD
  • Andrew Goldstein
  • Jerome W. Greenbaum, MD
  • Eugene M. Holleb, MD
  • Goodell G. Klevan, MD
  • Bernard Ritter, MD
  • Helen Rogers, RN
  • Stanley J. Snitow, MD

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